Tanifund Review: Bantu Petani indonesia

Hello everyone! This is the second review in my mini-series about investment opportunities in Indonesia. I don’t know why I’m talking about investments on this blog, but I said I was going to be more honest and more open, so I guess this is just like… sharing what I’ve been interested in recently.

 Tanifund

Tanifund won a competition a few days or weeks ago for being a promising startup, and that’s actually how I heard about it. You help contribute to capital for local farmers in Indonesia, who then use the funds to grow their farms.

  • Then, once the harvest is sold, the profits are shared–40% for the farmers, 40% for investors, and 20% for Tanifund. Tanifund works together with TaniHub, which already supplies a bunch of fresh food for local supermarkets like Giant and Hero.

Different choices available for investing.

  • Most investment opportunities provided by TaniFund last for one year, but there are a few that are long-term.
  • You won’t be able to access your money until the harvest and selling periods are over, so keep that in mind.
  • Different crops have different prospects, all of which are clearly outlined on their respective pages, and Tanifund provides photo updates every other month or so (it makes me really happy for some reason).

I appreciate how the calculations have all been clearly outlined, so investors can see how their money is going to be spent.

Here’s an example of the “updates” page under one crop that was funded a few months ago. You can see that they try to check in at least once a month. You can click on these for more information.

This is the nice thing, and probably what got me hooked on Tanifund in the first place. I like seeing the photos!

You can fund your account with a number of different banks. I really like how easy it is to get started.

Currently my money is locked away in the Durian/Mangosteen/Goat/etc. project for 15 years, but I’m hoping to make another investment once they open up another project.

  • Overall, I like how easy and friendly Tanifund is. The returns range from 10-40%, which is pretty reasonable in my opinion.

Minimum investment: Rp. 5.000.000 
Requirements: 
Indonesian bank account
Cara isi saldo: Virtual account (BCA, BRI, dll) a/n pendana

Pros of Tanifund:

-Easy to use.
-Great UI.
-Photo updates.
In-depth prospects sheet (this is the most important for me).
In-depth updates.
Returns range from 10-40%.
-Clear 1) background about the crop, 2) prospect information, 3) risk information, 4) farmer information, and 5) calculations/cost breakdown.

Cons of Tanifund:

-Minimal Rp. 5.000.000 to invest.
-No mobile application.

Feel free to see a comparison chart of all the investment programs I’ve reviewed so far here.

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2 Comments

  1. Thanks for the comprehensive review! Susah banget cari review investor fintech di Indonesia. Keep up the good work!

    So far I have only invested in peer to peer lending only, so this would be an interesting diversification as well. Anw do you have any referral code to share? And do they use virtual account on investor name?

    XOXO

    • You’re so very welcome! Terima kasih banyak ya kak, hehe. Kalo kakak investasi P2P lending dimana? Untuk Tanifund ada referral code-nya, pas top up bisa pake 8127535. (If you decide to use it, it would mean so much to me :’D)

      They use a virtual account under your name, bisa bank BCA, BNI, Permata, CIMB Niaga, dll. I really liked that about Tanifund tbh, jadi jauh lebih gampang hehe :p

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